Blog Archives

October 2, 2018

One of the great historic parks in New York City, Madison Square Park, is a seven-acre urban oasis. Between Fifth & Madison Avenues between 23rd & 26th Streets.

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October 2, 2018

When President Garfield was assassinated, Chester Arthur was sworn in as the 21st President of the United States in this house. Arthur died here in 1886.

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August 9, 2018

Located at 29 East 29th Street, The Redbury was formerly called The Martha Washington Hotel.  A women's hotel for 100 years, it was a center of the U.S. suffragette movement.

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August 9, 2018

A plaque marks the site of the last American home of Henry James. He completed 'Roderick Hudson' while living here.

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August 9, 2018

Delmonico's and Cafe Martin were THE society restaurants of the Gilded Age.  Located at Fifth Avenue and 26th Street from September 11, 1876 until April 18, 1899, Delmonico's became Cafe…

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August 9, 2018

The Museum of Mathematics (MoMath) illuminates the natural patterns and structures all around us and their underlying mathematical and geometric mysteries.

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February 19, 2014

The world’s first movie house opened at 1155 Broadway on April 6, 1894. It showed Thomas Edison’s hand-cranked movies for the first time.

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February 19, 2014

The Madison Square Theatre once boasted a number of innovations, including the first electric footlights, fold-up chairs and double-decker stage lifts.

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February 19, 2014

Originally planned to be 100 stories high, the Met Life North building only made it 29 floors.  Construction was halted due to the Great Depression.

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February 19, 2014

Between 1957 and 1965, The Jazz Loft saw the likes of  Thelonious Monk, Miles Davis, and other jazz greats gather for impromptu jam sessions.

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February 19, 2014

The Knickerbocker Base Ball Club played at an empty lot near this intersection, using the rules of modern baseball for the first time.

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February 19, 2014

The birthplace of Winston Churchill’s mother, the Jerome Mansion later became a 600-seat theater and in turn the headquarters of the Union League Club and The Metropolitan Club.  The Metropolitan…

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June 15, 2012

The First Moravian Church was established about 1849, and its congregation worshiped at the corner of Mott and Houston Streets until about 1866, when the church moved to this location.

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June 13, 2012

A street sign designates the corner at Park Avenue South as “Herman Melville Square," located near where one of America's greatest authors lived.

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June 7, 2012

The historic Haymarket was the most notorious dance hall/brothel in the Tenderloin at the end of the 19th Century.

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